Put on your walking shoes, we’re in London

Sep 14,2015

London was made for long, languid walks. Take your time to immerse yourself fully in the sights and sounds of the riverside walk at South Bank, one of the city’s liveliest parts. When you’ve reached our final destination of the Millennium Bridge, you’ll have seen this sprawling metropolis from a different perspective.

Grand Victorian, Georgian and contemporary edifices stand proudly along major thoroughfares, bustling with hordes of tourists. However, London’s real allure lies in its vast maze of cobblestoned alleyways and ancient streets, which hold numerous secrets and are best explored on foot.



Millennium Bridge with Tate Modern in the background. Credit: Simon Winnall / VisitBritain


To begin, catch the London Underground (or Tube) on the Circle/Distinct line from South Kensington, the station closest to Millennium Bailey's Hotel London Kensington, to Westminster station, which is only five stops away. Take the exit that leads to the resplendent Houses of Parliament and walk south to cross Westminster Bridge, the oldest bridge straddling the River Thames. The South Bank Lion stares across from the east bank, perhaps hoping to return to the entrance to the old Lion Brewery where Royal Festival Hall now stands.

March further along to County Hall which was the headquarters for the Greater London Council until 1986. Today, it houses myriad family-friendly attractions including the London Dungeon, a live interactive experience featuring gory re-enactments of macabre events from London's dark and sordid past; the truly sublime Sea Life London Aquarium; as well as Shrek's Adventure London, an immersive indoor theme park based on DreamWorks’s animated characters.

Standing tall at 135 metres is the London Eye, the next major attraction on this itinerary. Did you know that a single rotation on the Eye takes 30 minutes to complete and, on a clear day, you can see up to 40 kilometres away?

Take a step back in time at Shakespeare's Globe theatre, an awe-inspiring reproduction of the original Elizabethan wooden oak-framed Globe, which burned down in 1613. Most performances take place during the summer and autumn, and audiences can choose to stand in the Yard, which is open to the elements, or to sit in the sheltered stalls.

The Millennium Bridge is the final stop on this walk. Connecting London's financial heart, the city, to South Bank, this steel suspension bridge is a great vantage point for spectacular views of St Paul's Cathedral's south facade.

Want to stop somewhere for a leisurely bite? Here’s where you can find some great places for afternoon tea in London.

Strolling along the shores of South Bank by the meandering River Thames can be a tranquil experience despite the mad rush of people and cars.



View of South Bank and London Bridge from Victoria Tower. Credit: Andrew Pickett / VisitBritain


Not too far away from the London Eye are the Queen's Golden Jubilee Footbridges, both of which run on either side of the Hungerford Railway Bridge. Walk up the steps on one side and descend by the other for breathtaking vistas of London's most illustrious landmarks.

Next, drop by the Southbank Centre comprising five iconic venues dedicated to literature, as well as the fine and performing arts: Royal Festival Hall, Queen Elizabeth Hall, Purcell Room, Hayward Gallery and Poetry Library. Together, they play host to over 1000 music, dance and literary-related performances a year. Perched close by is the Royal National Theatre, which stages over 20 productions a year, including new plays.

Then continue on to Oxo Tower and stop for a quick bout of retail therapy at one of its quirky independent, design and arts and crafts shops. If you have time to spare, head up to the eighth floor to the public viewing gallery to capture the ever-changing architectural landscape of the city across the Thames.

Not too far away is the Tate Modern, Britain's national museum of international modern and contemporary art, housed in the imposing former Bankside Power Station. The galleries are built around a cavernous turbine hall, showcasing a carefully curated eclectic repertoire of permanent and temporary exhibitions spanning various periods.



Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre. Credit: John Wildgoose / The Globe Press Office


Take a step back in time at Shakespeare's Globe theatre, an awe-inspiring reproduction of the original Elizabethan wooden oak-framed Globe, which burned down in 1613. Most performances take place during the summer and autumn, and audiences can choose to stand in the Yard, which is open to the elements, or to sit in the sheltered stalls.

The Millennium Bridge is the final stop on this walk. Connecting London's financial heart, the city, to South Bank, this steel suspension bridge is a great vantage point for spectacular views of St Paul's Cathedral's south facade.

Want to stop somewhere for a leisurely bite? Here’s where you can find some great places for afternoon tea in London.


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